Chelmsford
(978) 441-9241

Newburyport
(978) 463-0086

Lawrence
(978) 552-3194


Blog

If you observe that your toenails have developed a blue or grayish hue, you may have what is referred to as poor circulation. Since the feet are typically the first area of the body where this condition is noticed, a blue or gray tinge is generally a good indicator that circulation concerns exist. There may be several reasons for this ailment to occur, and these may include a sedentary lifestyle, type 2 diabetes, or obesity. Consistent movement during the day, such as standing or walking, can help in allowing the arteries to freely carry blood and oxygen. Common symptoms that may be experienced can include a weakened pulse, cold sensations in the feet, or you may notice discolored skin. There are avenues that can be implemented to help poor circulation, including smoking cessation, incorporating exercise into your daily routine, and wearing comfortable shoes. If you would like information about poor circulation, please schedule a consultation with a podiatrist to discuss the best preventative techniques that are right for you.

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact one of our podiatrists of New England Foot and Ankle. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms:

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chelmsford, Newburyport, and Lawrence, MA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet

The feet are the foundation of the body, and the majority of runners are aware of the importance of choosing to wear proper running shoes. It’s helpful to be aware of your foot’s shape, as this will aid in buying shoes that fit properly. Shoes with added stability are often purchased by runners who have flat feet, and runners with exceptionally high arches are prone to choose shoes that have additional padding. Typically, most runners will go up half a size when buying running shoes, which will allow ample room for the toes to move about. When the right shoes are chosen that are a perfect fit for your feet, the sport of running may be enjoyed to its fullest extent.

If you are a runner, wearing the right running shoe is essential. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists from New England Foot and Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Choosing the Right Running Shoe for Your Foot Type

To increase performance and avoid the risk of injury, it is important to choose the right running shoe based on your foot type. The general design of running shoes revolves around pronation, which is how the ankle rolls from outside to inside when the foot strikes the ground.

  • Neutral runners are able to choose from a wide variety of shoes, including minimalist shoes or even going barefoot.
  • Runners who overpronate, or experience an over-abundance of ankle rolling, should choose shoes that provide extra motion control and stability.
  • Runners who underpronate, or supinate, have feet that have high arches and lack flexibility, preventing shock absorption. They require shoes with more flexibility and cushion.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chelmsford, Newburyport, and Lawrence, MA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Choosing the Right Running Shoe for Your Foot Type
Wednesday, 11 April 2018 00:00

Before you start dancing...

 

Monday, 09 April 2018 00:00

Symptoms of a Broken Ankle

If you have endured a fall or have experienced an intense injury to the ankle, you may have sustained a broken ankle. Symptoms of a broken ankle typically include severe pain around the ankle and surrounding areas that is accompanied by visible bruising and swelling. Is important to obtain immediate medical attention if you have what appears to be a broken ankle, as this may avoid the possibility of nerve and artery damage. A diagnosis typically includes having an X-ray performed, followed by an MRI, indicating a more detailed view of the ankle for more severe fractures. It may be suggested to wear a cast or a boot, which promotes stability in the ankle, and this may take 6-8 weeks to properly heal. During this time, crutches are generally used to prevent the ankle from incurring any weight. After the healing is completed, exercises may be necessary in recovering  foot and ankle flexibility.

Broken ankles need immediate treatment. If you are seeking treatment, contact one of our podiatrists from New England Foot and Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet. 

Broken Ankles
A broken ankle is experienced when a person fractures their tibia or fibula in the lower leg and ankle area. Both of these bones are attached at the bottom of the leg and combine to form what we know to be our ankle.

When a physician is referring to a break of the ankle, he or she is usually referring to a break in the area where the tibia and fibula are joined to create our ankle joint. Ankles are more prone to fractures because the ankle is an area that suffers a lot of pressure and stress. There are some obvious signs when a person experiences a fractured ankle, and the following symptoms may be present.

Symptoms of a Fractured Ankle

  • Excessive pain when the area is touched or when any pressure is placed on the ankle
  •  Swelling around the area
  •  Bruising of the area
  • Area appears to be deformed

If you suspect an ankle fracture, it is recommended to seek treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you have your podiatrist diagnose the fracture, the quicker you’ll be on the way towards recovery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chelmsford, Newburyport, and Lawrence, MA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about All About Broken Ankles
Monday, 02 April 2018 00:00

What Causes Hammertoe?

The foot may appear deformed if a condition known as hammertoe occurs. When the toes bend at the joint and the top of the toe bends down, a claw-like or hammer formation is apparent. This is possibly caused by a predisposed inherited gene originating from having little or no arch in the foot, or if the second toe exceeds the length of the first toe. Additional causes of this condition may be attributed to shoes that fit poorly, often crowding the toes into a space that is extremely small. There are symptoms that are easily noticed that are associated with hammertoes, such as observing if your toe is curling, in addition to experiencing discomfort and pain when the toes are stretched. Possible prevention of this aliment may include choosing to wear the correct shoes that provide adequate room for the toes, and avoiding shoes that are too short or tight. Treatment is necessary to lessen the discomfort, which may typically consist of exercises being performed that can aid in strengthening the tendons in the toes, or stabilizing the toe by applying a splint. A consultation with a podiatrist is advised if you would like additional information and treatment options for hammertoe.

Hammertoe

Hammertoes can be a painful condition to live with. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists from New England Foot and Ankle. Our doctors will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Hammertoe

Hammertoe is a foot deformity that affects the joints of the second, third, fourth, or fifth toes of your feet. It is a painful foot condition in which these toes curl and arch up, which can often lead to pain when wearing footwear.

Symptoms

  • Pain in the affected toes
  • Development of corns or calluses due to friction
  • Inflammation
  • Redness
  • Contracture of the toes

Causes

Genetics – People who are genetically predisposed to hammertoe are often more susceptible

Arthritis – Because arthritis affects the joints in your toes, further deformities stemming from arthritis can occur

Trauma – Direct trauma to the toes could potentially lead to hammertoe

Ill-fitting shoes – Undue pressure on the front of the toes from ill-fitting shoes can potentially lead to the development of hammertoe

Treatment

Orthotics – Custom made inserts can be used to help relieve pressure placed on the toes and therefore relieve some of the pain associated with it

Medications – Oral medications such as anti-inflammatories or NSAIDs could be used to treat the pain and inflammation hammertoes causes. Injections of corticosteroids are also sometimes used

Surgery – In more severe cases where the hammertoes have become more rigid, foot surgery is a potential option

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Chelmsford, Newburyport, and Lawrence, MA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What Are Hammertoes?
Connect with us