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Chelmsford
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Newburyport
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February 2020

Monday, 17 February 2020 00:00

The Function of the Plantar Fascia

The plantar fascia is a band of tissue that connects the heel to the toes. Strained ligaments in this part of the foot may cause a condition to occur that is referred to as plantar fasciitis. This ailment is considered to be the most common cause of foot pain in adults. The plantar fascia helps to provide the necessary support while performing running and jumping activities, and can cause severe pain and discomfort if it becomes inflamed. Plantar fasciitis may happen for a variety of reasons. These may include experiencing a foot injury, wearing shoes that do not fit correctly, or from standing for extended periods of time throughout the day. Common symptoms that patients may feel can consist of heel pain, which may be more prominent early in the morning. There are several types of treatments available, and it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can help you to determine which one is the best one for you.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact one of our podiatrists from New England Foot and Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chelmsfordand Newburyport, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Monday, 10 February 2020 00:00

Promptly Treating Wounds on the Feet

Many diabetic patients are aware of the importance of promptly treating existing foot wounds. There may be serious complications if foot wounds are not treated, which may cause pain and discomfort. Some of the wounds on the feet that can be dangerous to the health of a diabetic patient can include cuts, blisters, or severely dry skin that may result in cracked heels. There are noticeable signs an infection may have developed. These can consist of extreme pain, swelling, and pus may appear surrounding the affected area. Additionally, some patients may experience a high temperature, swollen glands, or a general feeling of being unwell. If you have wounds on your feet, it is strongly advised that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can treat existing wounds.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from New England Foot and Ankle. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chelmsfordand Newburyport, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 03 February 2020 00:00

Possible Symptoms of PAD

A medical condition that is referred to as peripheral artery disease (PAD) can have severe symptoms that often include muscle cramping in the legs and feet. Patients who exercise may notice the pain diminishes when activities are stopped. This can be a result of decreased blood flow. Additional symptoms of this ailment may consist of wounds on the feet or toes that may not heal properly, consistent leg pain, and the feet may feel cold for the majority of the day. It may also be indicative of heart issues, which is why it is important to be properly diagnosed. If you have a numbing or tingling sensation in your feet, it is advised that you consult with a podiatrist who can properly treat this condition.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with one of our podiatrists from New England Foot and Ankle. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heel
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chelmsfordand Newburyport, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
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